Where, oh where did my splenectomy go?

“It required invasive, painful surgeries that took hours and weeks to recover.”

Aw, please. Don’t go back and dredge up an old surgery. Let it go.

Surgeries take a long time to recover from.

Better to write “It required invasive, painful surgeries that took hours and weeks to recover from” — or, to be entirely proper: “It required invasive, painful surgeries from which it took hours and weeks to recover.”

If you’re going to lose a surgery, try to lose it beforehand. (Disclaimer: This is not official medical advice.)

3 thoughts on “Where, oh where did my splenectomy go?

  1. To be entirely proper (by not ending a sentence with a preposition)? How about the Addisonian termination:

    “Nor did the obsession that English sentences should ape classical models unduly influence [Joseph] Addison, an eighteenth-century writer remarkable for his fluent, easy, and polished diction. Indeed, so frequently did he end his sentences with a preposition that such a conclusion has been referred to as ‘the Addisonian termination.’ And, whatever pedants may say to the contrary, English people will continue to say, easily and unselfconsciously: ‘He is the man I spoke to.’ ‘This is what I was thinking of.’ ‘What are you talking about?’ ‘Who did you go with?’ ‘Speak when you are spoken to.”

    from Bryan Garner quoting W.P. Jowett (1945)

    Like

      1. Hi Doug, your post today on commas triggered a thought on only the most misplaced word in English: only.

        He^told^her^that^he^loved^her.

        In this example, replacing each chevron with “only” produces a different meaning each time. We tend to use it to modify the verb when it’s usually meant to modify the object.

        For example,

        1. Foreign investors can only buy new homes (they can’t rent or sell new homes) 2. Foreign investors can buy only new homes (they can’t buy used homes)

        Government intended 2 but wrote 1.

        Liked by 1 person

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